Archives for posts with tag: 64-bit

The Saga

I’ve definitely been beating my head on the desk with this one for a few days but finally found a solution thanks in part to Google.  I was attempting to install Additional Drivers for a printer that was shared/installed on a print server running Windows Server 2008 R2.  If you are reading this, then you no doubt have experienced the severe shortcoming by Microsoft in this area of O/S functionality.  It’s simply broken and I’m surprised that they have yet to fix it (I guess they want us all to move to Windows 7 ASAP).

When attempting to install the x86 User Mode drivers, I was first prompted for the location of the drivers.  Then soon after I was prompted for the Windows Server x86 installation media.  Huh?  Come to find out, the installer wanted the ntprint.inf file.  Unfortunately, there’s no easy way to get to this file because the installer will not accept it from the C:\Windows\inf folder or from the latest Windows Server 2008 media directly.

The solution is to utilize the Windows AIK‘s imagex tool to mount the install.wim file so that you can grab the ntprint.inf (and all of the other files necessary for installation).  So here’s how I got it resolved.

How to Install the ntprint.inf File on Windows Server 2008 R2

  1. Download and install the Windows AIK.   This particular one is for Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008.  Here’s the one for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2.  I didn’t perform these steps with the latter but if anyone wants to give it a shot, let me know.
  2. Insert the installation media for Windows Server 2008 32-bit and go to [drive]:\sources\ folder.
  3. Copy the install.wim file to a temporary folder–let’s say C:\TEMP.
  4. Create a folder to act as a mount point–let’s say C:\MOUNT will act as the mount point.
  5. After installing the Windows AIK on a server, go into the installation directory for Windows AIK.  On my machine it’s, C:\Program Files\Windows AIK.
  6. In the Windows AIK folder type the following command to mount the image: imagex /mount C:\TEMP\install.wim 1 C:\MOUNT.  This will mount the image in the C:\MOUNT folder so that you can browse its contents.
  7. Once the image is mounted go to C:\MOUNT\Windows\System32\DriverStore\FileRepository\ntprint.inf_xxxxxxxx, where the string of x’s represent a hexadecimal number.
  8. Within my particular install.wim file, there were 2 folders with the ntprint.inf_ name, so copy both of them to a network location that is accessible by your print server.
  9. Once the files have been copied go back to your print server and attempt to install the drivers again.  But, this time, when it asks for the ntprint.inf files, direct the installer to the network location that you copied the folders to.  I choose just 1 of the 2 folders that I copied (this first one) and the installation completed for me–printer installed just fine.
  10. (Cleanup) Go back to the Windows AIK and run imagex /unmount C:\MOUNT to unmount the image.

This sparred me a few brain cells so I hope to save a few of yours as well.  Good luck.

Now, Now VMware Let’s Be More Accurate

VMware ThinApp marketing slightly deceptive

VMwares not so accurate marketing message

A few weeks after writing How to ThinApp Smartstation?, I began pilot testing the ThinApp’d SmartStation to a small group of end users here at the firm.  Man was I unpleasantly surprised at just how limited ThinApp is.  There are a few “gotchas” specific to SmartStation that I would like to share that I had to learn the hard way.

SmartStation 4.5 is not supported on Windows 7 64-bit

This I knew going into the ThinApp process but the way that VMware has marketed the product, you’d think that this should not be an issue.  You’d think that it should work regardless of the O/S that the application is being deployed to.  WRONG! I filed a support request because I could not get my SmartStation ThinApp to work on Windows 7 64-bit.  The Support Technician informed me that:

Applications That ThinApp Cannot Virtualize ThinApp cannot convert some applications into virtual applications and might block certain application functions.  In those cases you must use traditional installation technologies to deploy some application types.

– Applications that do not natively support the deployment operating system:  If an operating system does not support the native installation of an application, that operating system is not a supported ThinApp deployment platform for that application.

And there you have it.  This information can also be found in the VMware ThinApp User’s Guide (which I must have overlooked). Read the rest of this entry »